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a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
. and it was an attempt to consolidate power and continue to centralize decision making in the u.s. house. >> a lot of conservatives are outraged by this... >> there was a fundamental dismantling here in washington of the tea party movement. i think they viewed the tea party movement as something that scared them. today what you see is, "now that we've broken you up, now you're going to do it my way." >> leadership gets rid of challenges... >> narrator: and with the election over, the deadline for the fiscal cliff was less than two months away. boehner made the first move. >> they wanted to get a card out there and put it down quickly. so they prepared a speech and went through 18 drafts. it was tinkered with right there on the teleprompter up until the final moments. >> house speaker john boehner is going to be speaking to reporters. his office says he wants to talk about the fiscal cliff... >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led, not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. >> the speaker came out and acknowledged that the president won. elections have consequens, and
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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